The Socionics Test:
Find Your Sociotype!

Recent Test Results

  1. ILI (INTp)
  2. LII (INTj)
  3. EII (INFj)
  4. ILI (INTp)
  5. SLI (ISTp)
  6. IEE (ENFp)
  7. ILI (INTp)

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Model A

Overview

Socionics organizes a person's psyche by dividing it into eight separate functions; this organizational structure is commonly referred to as Model A. Model A is one of the central foundations of socionics. Each function serves a different purpose and contains one information element. Put another way, Model A can be thought of as a synthesis of functions and information elements. Each sociotype has a unique pairing of functions and information elements, which gives each sociotype a unique Model A formulation.

Structure and Axioms of Model A

The structure of Model A is as follows. The model is comprised of eight functions and four blocks, with two functions in each block. Each block of Model A contains both a rational and irrational information element. The functions of Model A always have the same position and order for each type; it is the variation of what information elements are matched to those functions that determines the sociotype. The eight functions are as follows:

    Ego Block
  1. Leading Function
  2. Creative Function
  3. Super-Ego Block
  4. Role Function
  5. Vulnerable Function
  6. Id Block
  7. Suggestive Function
  8. Mobilizing Function
  9. Super-Id Block
  10. Ignoring Function
  11. Demonstrative Function

Rules of Positioning

There are a number of positioning rules for how information elements are placed into the functions.

  1. The accepting functions must contain either rational or irrational elements, and the producing functions the opposite.
  2. The mental (or conscious) functions must contain either static or dynamic elements, and the vital (or unconscious) functions the opposite.
  3. Each block must contain exactly one introverted element and one extroverted element.

Function and Block Characteristics

1. Leading Function
Accepting
Mental
Strong
Valued
2. Creative Function
Producing
Mental
Strong
Valued
4. Vulnerable Function
Producing
Mental
Weak
Unvalued
3. Role Function
Accepting
Mental
Weak
Unvalued
6. Mobilizing Function
Producing
Vital
Weak
Valued
5. Suggestive Function
Accepting
Vital
Weak
Valued
7. Ignoring Function
Accepting
Vital
Strong
Unvalued
8. Demonstrative Function
Producing
Vital
Strong
Unvalued

Overview

Each function and block of Model A have a number of important characteristics including valued/unvalued, strong/weak, mental/vital, and accepting/producing. These can be thought of as functional dichotomies (not to be confused with the 15 Jungian and Reinin dichotomies). The characteristics of each function will be shown first and then each functional dichotomy described in more detail.

The blocks in Model A are all interconnected to each other. Because the Ego block is both strong and valued, it essentially controls the person's information metabolism, direction of thought, etc. The Ego block sets the goals and direction, and then subconsciously relies on the Id block to provide necessary background information and data that the ego block will use in decision-making. Any conflicts between the Ego block and the Super-ego block generally result in the Ego block winning and the Super-ego block being relegated to a support role or sometimes completely ignored. Because the person is weak in the Super-id block but nevertheless values those information elements in the block, he seeks external support and input from others who value those information elements and are strong with them.

The following grid is a graphical representation of Model A that was created by Dragifon.

socionics/Model-A-Grid

The Accepting/Producing or Independent (fixed)/Dependent (variable) Dichotomy

The accepting functions are 1, 3, 5, and 7. The producing function are 2, 4, 6, and 8. The accepting trait can also be thought of as the independent or fixed trait, and the producing trait can also be thought of as the dependent or variable trait.

The Independent (Accepting) Trait

The term “independent” has a specific meaning in the context of this function dichotomy. Independent functions are generally able to generate or create a product without being inhibited or constrained by the dependent functions. n this sense, the product of the independent functions can be considered “fixed” in that they are generally not altered by the dependent functions. However in certain cases, the independent functions must change. These cases arise when a critical threshold of information is received that contradicts the independent functions/' product. This critical threshold is defined at the point when the dependent functions can no longer explain or justify how the new information received conforms to what the independent function has produced. At this point, the independent functions are forced to make corrections and adjustments to their product.

The Dependent (Producing) Trait

As with the term independent, the term “dependent” also has a specific meaning. When creating a product, the dependent functions generally try to conform to the product of the independent functions; they are dependent, constrained, and governed by what the independent functions have produced. The dependent functions can also be called variable. Variable means that the product of the dependent functions change and adapt relatively quickly in order to explain how new information received conforms to what the independent functions have produced.

Conclusion

In short, the independent functions have much more freedom to produce what they want and the dependent functions are much more constrained. Another way to think of it is that the independent functions set the parameters that the dependent functions must work within. The primary exception to this rule is when the dependent functions accrue a critical threshold of contradictory information, at which point the independent functions must make adjustments and corrections.

The Mental/Vital Dichotomy

The mental/vital dichotomy can also be thought of as the conscious/unconscious dichotomy. The conscious functions are functions 1-4 in Model A; these functions are also referred to as the mental ring. The unconscious functions are functions 5-8 in Model A; these functions are also referred to as the vital ring. The mental functions take a forward role in a person's information metabolism. They are readily used in conscious thought, conversations, verbalizing ideas, making observations, and other conscious thought processes. On the other hand, vital functions play a background role. They are just as active in information metabolism but play more of a support role to the mental functions. Essentially, the mental functions (primarily those in the Ego block) dictate the direction of thought but rely on the vital functions (primarily those in the Id block) for information and support.

The Strong/Weak Dichotomy

The Ego and Id functions are called strong, and the Super-ego and and super-id functions are called weak. Strong functions have a much higher capacity and ability to accurately metabolize information. This manifests in a more sophisticated understanding and use of the information in the function's sphere. The person feels confident in using these functions. It also generally results in increased reliance and use of these functions. Strong functions not only benefit oneself, but also those around him because the strength of the functions allows him to easily use the functions to help others in that area. Weak functions tend to oversimplify information, resulting in information metabolism that is less developed and thorough. The effect of this is twofold: (1)the person tends to avoid using these functions as much as he/she uses his strong functions, and (2) the person may seek assistance from others who are stronger with these functions if he values them. The person feels less confident using these functions.

The Valued/Unvalued Dichotomy

Valued functions include functions 1, 2, 5, and 6. Unvalued functions include functions 3, 4, 7, and 8. Because one's ego block (functions 1 and 2) are strong and valued, this forms the core of the person's socionics type. Because they are valued and strong, the person nearly always prefers using his ego block when processing information and appreciates others who value the same information elements. The Super-id block is also valued and because the person is weak in these functions, he seeks out others who are strong in those information elements (and value them like he/she does).

A person is indifferent to unvalued functions and see little reason to emphasize or focus on them. As such, a person tends to limit the use and freedom of these functions. As mentioned above, unvalued functions are found in both the Super-ego block and the Id block. Because they are unvalued, both these blocks are generally subjugated to the will of the valued blocks.

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